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NTLC Vows Support For Tinubu’s Administration In Health Sector

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Tinubu
Tinubu

In a significant show of solidarity, the Northern Traditional Leaders’ Committee on Primary Health Care Service Delivery (NTLC) has pledged its support to the administration of President Bola Tinubu.

This commitment was made during the NTLC’s second quarter review meeting, which was organised by the National Primary Health Care Development Agency (NPHCDA) and held in Abuja.

The NTLC meeting serves as a platform for the NPHCDA and its partners to engage traditional leaders in discussions about their role and responsibilities in improving primary health care delivery within their communities. At the event, the Sultan of Sokoto, Alhaji Muhammad Abubakar, expressed his admiration for President Tinubu’s exceptional skills and understanding of the longstanding challenges that have hindered the country’s progress for decades. The Sultan assured the president of the traditional leaders’ unwavering dedication and support.

Moreover, the Sultan urged the traditional leaders, the new government, and the state governors to collaborate closely to enhance primary health care delivery throughout the country. He expressed confidence that by working together, the committee could make significant strides in addressing the nation’s healthcare challenges.

Emphasising the importance of collaboration with the new government, the Sultan thanked the committee members for their tireless efforts in saving and serving humanity. As the committee’s patron, he acknowledged the crucial role played by traditional leaders as major stakeholders in the governance of the nation. He emphasised the need to promptly brief the new executives on the committee’s work over the past 14 years and to seek the government’s support for their continued success.

The Sultan also highlighted the necessity for state governors to offer total support to the committee’s endeavours, as they play a vital role in allowing members from various states to participate in these programs. He recognised the members’ commitment as instrumental in the committee’s achievements thus far.

Addressing the challenges ahead, the Sultan drew attention to the plight of numerous displaced persons in six states, making it difficult to provide them with essential healthcare services. He stressed the urgent need for collaboration with the state governors to develop strategies for reaching out to these vulnerable populations.

Assuring the attendees, the Sultan pledged that the committee would redouble its efforts to overcome the obstacles they face. He acknowledged the heightened expectations of the public, who now eagerly anticipate tangible improvements in healthcare delivery.

Meanwhile, the executive director of the National Primary Health Care Development Agency (NPHCDA), Dr. Faisal Shuaib stated that the meeting provided an opportunity to discuss ways to reduce the burden of zero-dose children in the country. These are children under five years of age who have never received the required vaccinations for their age. Shuaib also highlighted the importance of improving primary healthcare service delivery and discussed the campaign against circulating variants of Polio Virus type 2. Furthermore, he outlined the plans to introduce the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines into the country’s immunization schedule. Shuaib mentioned the milestones achieved in immunizing 70 per cent of the eligible population against COVID-19.

The NTLC meeting saw the participation of representatives from all 19 northern states and the FCT, NPHCDA management, and development partners, including the World Health Organisation (WHO). The gathering marked a significant step toward strengthening collaboration between traditional leaders and the government in their shared mission to enhance primary health care delivery for all Nigerians.

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